2010 McLaren MP4-12C (Video) review and pictures

Posted on Friday, 19 March 2010 , 14:03:07 byAngela

Filed under McLarenMercedesSupercarsSuperSportGerman

McLaren MP4-12C  (Video)

McLaren Automotive developed the MP4-12C, a sports car that is ground-breaking, efficient, high-quality, lightweight, practical, dynamic, safe, comfortable and with incredible visual effects. The carmaker now has a heritage of 47 years, in 44 of which it has been represented at the pinnacle of motorsport. McLaren has been on the podium on two of every three races in which it has competed. The carbon composite monocoque, or chassis, is a trademark feature on both McLaren production cars. Actually, McLaren is the pioneer in bringing this strong, light and safe material from the aerospace industry to Formula 1 in the 1981 McLaren MP4/1. Furthermore, carbon fiber is torsionally rigid creating a sound basis for locating moving parts such as suspension, thereby offering greater accuracy in maintaining geometry and tire contact with the road. Its other main advantages are strength and safety. In a sport that lost many drivers, a carbon safety cell does much to help them survive massive impacts. Another huge benefit of carbon technology can be seen at any Grand Prix when cars come in to replace the nose structure after contact. Like carbon composite technology, aerodynamics filtered into motor sport from aerospace. Early attempts at aerodynamics in motor racing consisted of attaching stands of wool to the body surfaces and filming where the airflow blew them. McLaren has played a major part in honing the accuracy of wind tunnel use and data interpretation through its work with the Formula 1 team. Just like a F1 engine, the one that powers the MP4-12C is both light and compact and features a relatively small swept volume of 3.8-liters. The M838T is a low weight alternative to the larger capacity engines that power all other cars in the 12C market segment. Power and drivability torque are the requirements in motorsport, but for road use there is a requirement for greater flexibility with less focus on absolute output.