SuperTruck manages to improve fuel economy

Posted on Monday, 25 March 2013 , 06:03:35 byEmil

Filed under supertrucktechnologyamericanfuel-consumptionpowerTrucks-PickupsAmericanTechnology

SuperTruck manages to improve fuel economy


In case you did not find out until now, SuperTruck achieves 54 % increase in fuel economy according to Cummins and Peterbilt Company, a division of PACCAR. The increase was averaging almost 10 miles per gallon under real world driving conditions. The Supertruck developed by the two companies features a higher-efficiency engine and an aerodynamic tractor-trailer that reduces drag. Know that the truck includes a system that converts exhaust heat into power delivered to the crankshaft, electronic controls that use route information to optimize fuel use, tires with lower rolling resistance and also lighter-weight material throughout. Apparently the Class 8 Peterbilt 587 that receives power from a Cummins ISX15 engine uses a 9.9 mpg during testing last fall on US Route 287 between Fort Worth and Vernon, Texas. The tractor-trailer had a combined gross weight of 65.000 lbs and the test was conducted over 11 runs meeting SAE International test standards along a route measuring 312 miles.



The long-haul trucks achieve 5.5 and 6.5 mpg and the 54 % increase in fuel economy would save around $25.000 annually. This amount refers to the prices of the diesel today travelling 120.000 miles per year. In terms of greenhouse gases, the reduction would be of around 35 % per year. Overall, the saving would be great considering that about 2 million tractor-trailers are registered on US roads today. This numbers were offered by the American Trucking Association. Besides the fuel economy, the truck also achieves a 61% improvement in freight efficiency during testing compared to a baseline truck that also uses the same route. For those of you who do not know, freight efficiency is an important metric in the transportation industry based on payload weight and fuel efficiency expressed in tone-miles per gallon. The engineers are trying to develop different changes in the combustion system, but they are also trying to reduce internal friction. Aerodynamics has a lot to do with the extra power.